Nurses World Magazine Review Total Nutrition Cooking

John R. Wilson, PhD (published in Nurses World Magazine, April 2007)

Larrian Gillespie is nothing if not forthright. She recommends “Nutrition Queens,” i.e., eating nutrition-dense foods included in the USDA Food Pyramid of 2005, and thirty minutes of “exhilarating exercise” each day. Then everyone (most of us, some of us) can say goodbye to heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and cancer. (I don’t wonder at the book’s disclaimers: This book “is sold with the understanding that the author and its publishers are not engaged in rendering professional services. … If a reader requires personal assistance or advice, a competent professional should be consulted.”)

That said, I am so glad that Gillespie wrote this book.

Her recipes are reasons to live! How about an appetizer of smoky cilantro and lime shrimp, or some “cranky crab” soup with spinach? Care to try the Portobello mushroom, tomato and basil sandwich or a tarragon chicken, raisin and almond sandwich on fresh, warm sourdough bread? Then there’s the tuna-curry pasta with cashews, scallops with peppered bacon and shallots, and butternut squash and cinnamon brown sugar, not to mention the apricot-honey and mustard pork tenderloin (Oh, my God!). If it’s desserts you crave, then try the almond-chocolate pudding, the coconut custard baked in acorn squash or Auntie Em’s comforting rice pudding.

What’s particularly refreshing is that this book doesn’t assert an umbrella diet for everyone. It does suggest that the relationship between diet and health is complex, that nutritional needs vary, and that dietary discretion, regular exercise, stress management and abstention from tobacco can prolong good health.

Who needs heaven? All I need is a copy of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Total Nutrition Cooking and maybe a pinch of restraint.

reprinted with Permission, Nurses World Magazine


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Top 6 Best Fruits for a Low Carb Diet

Looking for the Top 6 Best Fruits for a Low Carb Diet? What…you can’t have any fruit on a low carb diet?

If you think sticking to a low carb diet plan means shunning fruit, you’re not alone. In a survey, 30% of low carb dieters said they had reduced their fruit intake and 14% had stopped eating fruit altogether. This means roughly 11 million Americans have dropped some essential nutrients from their diets.

Eliminating fruits is a common misconception. Fruits, especially the ones below, will provide building-block nutrients in your diet while not raising your blood sugar, AND they provide an excellent source of fiber.

Which fruit packs the biggest nutrition punch? It’s the lowly Kiwi! So be sure and include 1 cup of fruit a day in your low carb diet plan.

Here’s my Top 6 Best Fruits for a Low Carb Diet and their carb count per one cup serving:

KIWI 14gm

AVOCADO 12gm

PAPAYA 14gm

CANTALOUPE 18gm

STRAWBERRIES 11gm

GRAPEFRUIT12gm

See? Now wasn’t that easy and tasty? It’s no problem having fruit on a low carb diet if you choose wisely.


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Potassium Carbonate Better Than Bone Drugs

Twelve-month daily alkali therapy with potassium citrate supplements resulted in a nearly 2% increase in lumbar spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD) in a small randomized controlled trial of postmenopausal women with osteopenia. These results, published in the October 2006 issue of the Journal of American Society of Nephrology, suggest that citrate partially reverses the high acidity of the modern Western diet and that this promotes better skeletal health, the researchers, led by Sigrid Jehle, MD, at the Department of Medicine, University of Basel in Bruderholz/Basel, Switzerland, write.

“We showed that BMD was significantly increased in the lumbar spine and the hip after 12 months of a very modest amount of alkali (30 mmol of inexpensive K [potassium] citrate daily) in postmenopausal women with low bone mass (T scores at the lumbar spine of -1 to -4). This was achieved with virtually no side effects.”

The women were randomized to receive tablets of potassium citrate or potassium chloride (3 times 10 mmol daily), and all subjects also received calcium carbonate (500 mg of calcium) and 400 IU of vitamin D3 daily. They were instructed to maintain their current eating and exercise habits.

Study Highlights
Inclusion criteria were women who were nonvegetarians, at least 5 years postmenopausal, younger than 70 years of age, and had T scores at lumbar spine L2 to L4 of -1 to -4.

Women were instructed to continue their self-selected diet and exercise regimen. 89 women were randomized to 10 mmol of trivalent potassium citrate in 3 daytime doses, yielding 30 mmol of potassium and 30 mmol of base (bicarbonate) daily, and 92 to 30 mmol of potassium chloride. Both groups received calcium carbonate containing 500 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D daily.

I’ve been telling women since 1986, when early FDA studies on bone drugs were compared to the known benefits/response of taking potassium carbonate, that you can achieve the same or BETTER response WITHOUT the side effects of pharmaceutical drugs, simply by taking potassium carbonate.

Now we can improve on this by taking liquid bioavailable minerals containing silica which works synergystically with potassium carbonate. Just one dropper twice a day is all you need. Here’s to better bone health!


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Rebound Weight Gain for Yo-Yo Dieters

New Study Explains Rebound Weight Gain

You read the title correctly. In a study published in the American
Journal of Human Biology, researchers studied the sad irony of obesity
in developing food-starved nations. “In the same household, you can
have a chubby kid and a starving kid,” , the lead researcher, stated.

He argues that obesity in developing nations is a result of the body’s
attempts to cope with childhood malnourishment. The phenomena is similar
to yo-yo dieting, where dieters who have deprived themselves gain weight
at faster rates than non-dieters when they begin eating normally again.

Under normal nutritional conditions, humans only absorb about 80 percent
of the nutrients from the food they eat, and the rest of the nutrients
pass through the body. But when deprived of nourishment, the body becomes
a super efficient machine, Frisancho said, pulling all the nutrients
from the food for energy. Further, because humans need a certain percentage
of body fat reserves to stay alive and because it takes more work for
the body to burn fat than carbohydrate, the body in starvation mode
learns to burn carbohydrate for energy and to store fat, rather than
to use the energy for growth.

I have never been a fan of induction stages of dieting, which are often
prolonged beyond the first two weeks of any diet. As demonstrated in
this article, continuous restriction of carbohydrates will only result
in rebound weight gain. That’s why it’s so important to choose the RIGHT
carbs to eat and to maintain a healthy ratio of about 35% of your diet
as high fiber, low glycemic carbs if you want to prevent rebound weight
gain when aiming for a maintenance, healthy diet.

Reduced rate of fat oxidation: a metabolic pathway to obesity in the
developing nations,

Am J Hum Biol. 2003 Jul-Aug;15(4):522-32.


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